1,000 Jazz Albums You Should Hear Before You Die (961-970)

Here is another 10 to add to the list.

We are getting close! Just a handful of albums left to add. Remember that there is no ranking system here. Hopefully these lists will inspire you to seek some of these albums out that perhaps you haven’t heard before, or revisit an old favorite. And as always, we want your thoughts on any or all of these albums. Here, in no particular order, are albums 961 through 970.

961. One Night in Washington – Dizzy Gillespie (Collectibles, 1955) CLICK HERE TO BUY

962. Road Band – Woody Herman (Membran, 1955) CLICK HERE TO BUY

963. Stay with Me – Billie Holiday (Verve, 1959) CLICK HERE TO BUY

964. Earl’s Pearls – Earl Hines (Unlimited, 1960) CLICK HERE TO BUY

965. Genius of Modern Music, Vol. 1 – Thelonious Monk (Discovery, 1952) CLICK HERE TO BUY

966. The Joint is Jumpin’ – Fats Waller (Bluebird RCA, 1929-1943 recording dates, 1987 compilations date) CLICK HERE TO BUY

967. Mingus at the Bohemia – Charles Mingus (Original Jazz Classics, 1955) CLICK HERE TO BUY

968. King of the Tenors – Ben Webster (Verve, 1956) CLICK HERE TO BUY

969. Count Basie in London – Count Basie (Verve, 1956) CLICK HERE TO BUY

970. Live: 1939-1941 – Charlie Christian (Jazz Archives (France) 1939-1941 recording dates, 1996 compilation date) CLICK HERE TO BUY

1,000 Jazz Albums You Should Hear Before You Die (951-960)

1,000 Jazz Albums You Should Hear Before You Die (941-950)

1,000 Jazz Albums You Should Hear Before You Die (931-940)

1,000 Jazz Albums You Should Hear Before You Die (921-930)

1,000 Jazz Albums You Should Hear Before You Die (911-920)

1,000 Jazz Albums You Should Hear Before You Die (901-910)

1,000 Jazz Albums You Should Hear Before You Die – The First 750

1,000 Jazz Albums You Should Hear Before You Die – The First 500

1,000 Jazz Albums You Should Hear Before You Die (951-960)

Here is another 10 to add to the list.

Remember that there is no ranking system here, and if you don’t see your favorite jazz album yet, it doesn’t mean it won’t show up.

Hopefully these lists will inspire you to seek some of these albums out that perhaps you haven’t heard before, or revisit an old favorite. And as always, we want your thoughts on any or all of these albums. Here, in no particular order, are albums 951 through 960.

951. Satch Plays Fats: The Music of Fats Waller – Louis Armstrong (Columbia, 1955) CLICK HERE TO BUY

952. Lee-Way – Lee Morgan (APO (Analogue Production Originals), 1960) CLICK HERE TO BUY

953. Piano in the Background – Duke Ellington (Sony Music Distribution, 1960) CLICK HERE TO BUY

954. The Complete Gramercy Five Sessions – Artie Shaw (Bluebird RCA, 1940-1945 recording dates, 1989 compilation date) CLICK HERE TO BUY

955. Walkin’ – Miles Davis (Original Jazz Classics, 1954) CLICK HERE TO BUY

956. The Inner Mounting Flame – John McLaughlin/Mahavishnu Orchestra (Columbia/Legacy, 1971) CLICK HERE TO BUY

957. Bird and Diz – Charlie Parker/Dizzy Gillespie (Verve/Polygram, 1950 recording dates, 1956 release date) CLICK HERE TO BUY

958. Trombone by Three – Bennie Green/J.J. Johnson/Kai Winding (Original Jazz Classics, 1956) CLICK HERE TO BUY

959. Cattin’ With Coltrane and Quinichette – John Coltrane/Paul Quinichette (Original Jazz Classics, 1957) CLICK HERE TO BUY

960. Boss Guitar – Wes Montgomery (Concord/Concord Music Group/Fantasy/Universal Music, 1963) CLICK HERE TO BUY

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1,000 Jazz Albums You Should Hear Before You Die (941-950)

1,000 Jazz Albums You Should Hear Before You Die (931-940)

1,000 Jazz Albums You Should Hear Before You Die (921-930)

1,000 Jazz Albums You Should Hear Before You Die (911-920)

1,000 Jazz Albums You Should Hear Before You Die (901-910)

1,000 Jazz Albums You Should Hear Before You Die – The First 750

1,000 Jazz Albums You Should Hear Before You Die – The First 500

Legendary jazz trumpeter Donald Byrd has died, says nephew

The Guardian reports that legendary trumpeter Donald Byrd has died, according to the nephew of Byrd.

According to the article, the nephew says that he died on Monday in Delaware, where Byrd lived. Here is more from the article:

The influential jazz trumpeter Donald Byrd died on Monday at the age of 80, his nephew has said.

Alex Bugnon, a jazz pianist, reported his uncle’s death on Thursday, though it has yet to be confirmed.

Bugnon wrote on his own Facebook page: “Donald passed away Monday in Delaware, where he lived. His funeral will be held in Detroit sometime next week. I have no more patience for this unnecessary shroud of secrecy placed over his death by certain members of his immediate family.”

CLICK HERE TO READ THE FULL ARTICLE FROM THE GUARDIAN

50 Greatest Jazz Vocals of All Time

50 Great Jazz Vocals is a crowdsourced list of the 50 most popular jazz vocal recordings of all time, as determined by the listeners of NPR Music, Jazz24.org and KPLU in Seattle. We asked jazz lovers all over the world to vote for their favorites. When the results were in, the thousands of votes were tabulated, and this list is the result. You can take a look at the list below or, better yet, dive into the webstream, kick back and listen to all 50 Great Jazz Vocals. According to our listeners, it doesn’t get any better than this.

I had the opportunity to speak with KPLU’s Kirsten Kendrick about this list. You can listen to our discussion here.

Here are the winners:

50 Great Jazz Vocals: The List

1. Billie Holiday, “Strange Fruit”
2. Johnny Hartman & John Coltrane, “Lush Life”
3. Billie Holiday, “God Bless the Child”
4. Ella Fitzgerald, “How High the Moon”
5. Ella Fitzgerald, “Mack the Knife”
6. Etta James, “At Last”
7. Louis Armstrong, “What a Wonderful World”
8. Chet Baker, “My Funny Valentine”
9. Stan Getz & Astrud Gilberto, “Girl From Ipanema”
10. Peggy Lee, “Fever”
11. Sarah Vaughan, “Lullaby of Birdland”
12. Ella Fitzgerald, “Summertime”
13. The Manhattan Transfer, “Birdland”
14. Johnny Hartman & John Coltrane, “My One and Only Love”
15. Nina Simone, “I Loves You, Porgy”
16. Ella Fitzgerald, “A-Tisket, A-Tasket”
17. Joe Williams with Count Basie & His Orchestra, “Everyday I Have the Blues”
18. Billie Holiday, “Autumn in New York”
19. Sarah Vaughan, “Misty”
20. Ella Fitzgerald, “Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered”
21. Nina Simone, “Feeling Good”
22. Billie Holiday, “Fine and Mellow”
23. Nina Simone, “My Baby Just Cares for Me”
24. Nat King Cole, “Route 66”
25. Frank Sinatra, “One for My Baby (And One More for the Road)”
26. Ella Fitzgerald, “Blue Skies”
27. June Christy, “Something Cool”
28. Ray Charles, “Georgia on My Mind”
29. Frank Sinatra, “I’ve Got You Under My Skin”
30. Anita O’Day, “Sweet Georgia Brown”
31. Billie Holiday, “All of Me”
32. Louis Armstrong, “Black and Blue”
33. Susannah McCorkle, “The Waters of March”
34. Frank Sinatra, “Fly Me to the Moon”
35. Billie Holiday, “Good Morning Heartache”
36. Louis Armstrong & Oscar Peterson, “You Go to My Head”
37. Clark Terry, “Mumbles”
38. Billie Holiday, “My Man”
39. Diana Krall, “Peel Me a Grape”
40. Nat King Cole, “Unforgettable”
41. Nat King Cole, “Stardust”
42. Chet Baker, “Let’s Get Lost”
43. Billie Holiday, “Lover Man”
44. Ella Fitzgerald, “Someone to Watch Over Me”
45. Eva Cassidy, “Autumn Leaves”
46. Johnny Hartman & John Coltrane, “They Say It’s Wonderful”
47. Les McCann & Eddie Harris, “Compared To What”
48. Julie London, “Cry Me a River”
49. Cab Calloway, “Minnie the Moocher”
50. Nat King Cole, “Nature Boy”

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Juan de Marcos and the Afro-Cuban All Stars

 

Juan de Marcos

 

Cuban bandleader, composer and arranger Juan de Marcos González is known as the “Quincy Jones of Cuba” and as the architect of the Afro-Cuban All Stars (the foundation for The Buena Vista Social Club), and the founder of another successful Cuban band, Sierra Maestra.  His father was a singer for Arsenio Rodriguez’s Orchestra; his uncle was Ruben González, famed pianist for the Buena Vista Social Club.

Juan’s mission is the preservation of his rich musical heritage.

His Afro-Cuban All Stars is a unique orchestra devoted to promoting the complete story of Cuban music.

The 1996 Afro-Cuban All Stars recording “A Toda Cuba Le Gusta” featured nearly 60 performers. Then, with celebrated artists Compay Segundo, Eliades Ochoa, and American guitarist Ry Cooder, the unforgettable Buena Vista Social Club CD was recorded.

Fusing contemporary, traditional and a hint of the future styles of Cuban music, the band is multi-generational, sometimes featuring musicians from the ages of 19 to 90.  The current line-up consists of Cuban expatriate musicians, all alumni of Cuba’s greatest bands.  Continuing the family traditon, the band also includes Juan’s wife and general manager, Gliceria Abreu on percussion, and his daughters Laura Lydia Gonzalez (clarinet and saxophone) and Gliceria Gonzalez (keyboards).

The band’s outstanding 2011 release “Absolutely Live” is a DVD/CD combination, featuring performances in Japan and The Hague, Netherlands.

You can see this remarkable show live at Seattle’s Jazz Alley this Thursday 2/7 through Sunday 2/10.  They’re also featured on the première of KCTS9’s new program “Pie” airing this Thursday at 7pm.

Hear more great Cuban music on Jazz Caliente, Thursday afternoons at 2pm on KPLU’s Mid Day Jazz.